It took me a long time to read this article because every paragraph was newly infuriating

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The state is as politically divided as the rest of the nation. One can drive across it and be in two different states at the same time: FM Texas and AM Texas. FM Texas is the silky voice of city dwellers, the kingdom of NPR. It is progressive, blue, reasonable, secular, and smug—almost like California. AM Texas speaks to the suburbs and the rural areas: Trumpland. It’s endless bluster and endless ads. Paranoia and piety are the main items on the menu.

pub. 07/2017

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House Republicans are trying to prevent investigations into violations of church-state separation

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“Section 116 would make it very difficult for the IRS to investigate claims that churches have violated the law by requiring consent from the IRS Commissioner for each investigation and notification to two committees in Congress before such investigations commence. The first requirement would slow down, if not functionally halt, the pursuit of 501(c)(3) violations, while the second would only further politicize these investigations.”

(Quote is from a letter linked in the article.)

pub. 06/2017

Video: From the gentlest of atheist debaters, effective methods for undermining people’s non-evidence-based beliefs

Screen Shot 2017-05-18 at 13.10.42Huh, that headline is hard to connect with. Let’s try again:

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Street epistemology is a method of asking people not only what their beliefs are and why they believe them, but most importantly how they determined their beliefs are true. We know that being presented with established facts only causes “the other side” of any debate to dig in deeper, so street epistemology skips specific facts altogether to focus on the bigger picture. This video is an introduction to the concept.

The changing morality of white evangelicals

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Amid this identity crisis, fears about cultural change and nostalgia for a lost era — bound together with the ties of partisan identity — combined to overwhelm the once confident logic of moral values. The Southern Baptist Convention’s Russell Moore, an early and consistent critic of Trump, put it starkly. White evangelicals have, he argued, simply adopted “a political agenda in search of a gospel useful enough to accommodate it.”

pub. 11/2016

 

Conservatives without religion are still intolerant, and without a church’s positive messages

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Why did these religiously unaffiliated Republicans embrace Trump’s bleak view of America more readily than their churchgoing peers? … Establishing causation is difficult, but we know that culturally conservative white Americans who are disengaged from church experience less economic success and more family breakdown than those who remain connected, and they grow more pessimistic and resentful.

pub. 04/2017